Safer homes for disabled children – crowdfunding cases for disabled children’s rights

Disabled children need safe and suitable homes – but with the housing crisis in parts of the country it is unsurprising that many disabled children have neither. The families of two disabled children (M and A) are challenging Islington council for failing to provide them with accommodation where they will be safe from falling and have sufficient space to meet their needs.

The challenge failed in the High Court. In particular the Judge held that the duty to co-operate between housing and children’s services in section 27 of the Children Act 1989 did not apply to ‘unitary’ authorities, for example London councils. Secondly the Judge held that the failure to put in place a child in need plan for M or A was not unlawful – despite the clear terms of the statutory guidance requiring such plans. Both these findings may reduce the protection of the Children Act scheme for disabled children if left unchallenged.

To their credit M and A’s families are willing to carry on the fight to the Court of Appeal. The issues their cases raise are obviously of very wide importance, potentially affecting thousands of families with disabled children. As such their legal team has worked with the organisation Crowdjustice to see if money can be raised from the community. The initial target is 3,000 pounds, which will allow the appeal to proceed to the next stage.

In my view the attempt to crowdfund M and A’s appeal is hugely significant. If it works in this case it can work in other cases – and be an answer in the right cases to the problems caused by the restrictions on legal aid.

Please consider supporting this important appeal by donating through Crowdjustice Please also spread the link throughout your networks.

For information on disabled children’s rights to housing see chapter 7 of the second edition of Disabled Children: A Legal Handbook. The section of this chapter in relation to accessing suitable housing for disabled children and families was written by M and A’s solicitor Rebekah Carrier.

Disclaimer – I work closely with the legal team for M and A. However I am not instructed on this particular case.