SEND Tribunal health and social care powers – still no parity with education

by stevebroach

A parent of an autistic child once told me that the real ‘triad of impairments’ experienced by her family was education, health and social care. Disabled children’s needs don’t exist within neat service boxes, but there remain deep silos between these three different agencies.

The Children and Families Act 2014 went some limited way to addressing this problem, particularly through the creation of Education, Health and Care Plans (EHCPs). However even within the context of EHCPs real divisions between the three service areas remain. For example, the trigger for an EHC needs assessment is only (in short) significant levels of educational need. A child could have the most complex health or social care needs and still not qualify even for this form of assessment if their educational needs are modest.

Even for those children who do qualify for an EHCP, the duties to implement the provision in the plan are different across the different agencies. Section 42 of the 2014 Act imposes duties on local authorities to ‘secure the specified special educational provision for the child or young person’ and on CCGs to ‘arrange the specified health care provision for the child or young person’. Section 42 doesn’t say anything about social care provision, so this area of provision is underpinned only by the previously existing law, in particular section 2 of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970 which is horribly out of date.

The fact that it continues to matter greatly whether needs or provision are educational, health or social care is demonstrated by section 20(5) of the 2014 Act. This put into statute a rule that ‘Health care provision or social care provision which educates or trains a child or young person is to be treated as special educational provision (instead of health care provision or social care provision)’. This ‘deeming provision’ turns (for example) a host of therapy services which might generally be the responsibility of the NHS into ‘educational provision’ for children with EHCPs, meaning that such provision becomes the responsibility of the local authority for those children.

All this brings us on to the latest innovation in the SEN system – the nationwide extension of the pilot allowing the Tribunal to make recommendations in relation to health and social care provision (i.e. all health and social care provision that isn’t ‘deemed’ to be educational provision). This is brought about by the SEND (First-tier Tribunal Recommendations Power) Regulations 2017. There is an excellent background article on the Tribunal’s new powers on the Special Needs Jungle website, including a link to the analysis by CEDAR of the very limited earlier trial.

A few things to note:

  1. These regulations come into force on 3 April 2018 and only apply to appeals (a) against decisions of local authorities made on or after that date or (b) relating to an EHCP made or amended on or after that date. It is expected that this nationwide trial will last two years.
  2. Unlike in relation to the SEN sections of an EHCP which the Tribunal can require to be rewritten, the Tribunal’s powers in relation to health and social care needs and provision are limited to making ‘recommendations’ .
  3. By their nature recommendations are non-binding. There may well therefore be cases where the local authority or CCG consider and reject the Tribunal’s recommendations. The remedy in such cases would be a complaint to the Ombudsman or (in serious and urgent cases) an application for judicial review (JR). However a successful JR would need to show an error of law in the approach of the local authority and / or CCG, for example irrationality or a failure to take all material considerations into account.
  4. The duty on the CCG or local authority is to respond to any relevant recommendations, including giving written reasons for any decision not to follow all or part of the recommendation.

It is therefore crystal clear that even when this new power comes into force the appeal rights available to parents and young people will be weaker in relation to health and social care than presently exist in relation to SEN. The Department for Education has stated that ‘we would generally expect that recommendations are followed’, however such an expectation has no legal force. It is though likely that many Tribunal recommendations on health and / or social care provision will be followed by local authorities and CCGs, at least in part. If they are not, then the requirement to provide written reasons will give young people and parents a sound foundation for further challenge in appropriate cases. This represents progress, even if we remain a long way from a properly joined up system for disabled children, young people and families.

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